Missing Turtle

Larry

For more than a year there was a turtle living at Fish Eye Marine Park. He ate the food that they threw in the water for the fish, and visited with the tourists. Some people called him “Larry,” and other people called him “Crush.”

I don’t know what he called himself.

However, he had a small metal tag under each front flipper. One said NOAA Maui USA, and the other said PI2775. He was a green sea turtle who was approximately 50 years of age, and he had a girl turtle in the Piti Bomb Holes near by that he seemed to visit with.

In Mid-July, the tour operators at Fish Eye watched as people from the Department of Agriculture came and took Larry the turtle away.

They said they were taking him “to study,” according to the tour operators.

However, when we called the Department of Agriculture, they  claimed that the turtle “was a nuisance” and so as moved “to the other side of the island.”

Now of course, this was not his first time being caught on Guam. The Marine Biologists at Underwater World took him for study. They weighed him, measured him, and then released him on the other side of the island.

He swam right back, because he enjoys people and food.

However, after the Department of Agriculture claims to have taken him “to the other side of the island,” he did not swim back.

He was a very strong swimmer, and you can be sure that he was capable. How can you be sure, you ask? Well, the people at Underwater World were actually hoping that they could find some evidence that his rear flipper (which was damaged) made it too difficult for him to be in the wild.

They hoped this because they have a rescued sea turtle in the aquarium already, and they hoped for a second.

However, according to the laws governing the treatment of an endangered species, if they are found to be able to survive on their own, they cannot be “rescued.”

Ergo, we know that if the turtle had actually been released by the Department of Agriculture, he would have swam back as he had done before.

We cannot make conclusions from the information that we have. However, we can know two things for sure.

1. Turtle meat fetches a high price on Guam and on the other islands in the chain, because the Native people eat turtle. They know that these turtles are endangered, but some choose to do it anyway. Anyone who took the turtle to sell would have made a LOT of money.

2. They were very suspicious on the phone and asked for my husband’s full name and information before claiming that the turtle was moved. If they are keeping track of who is asking, then one would suggest that they have a reason to be worried.

I am not saying that the Department of Agriculture sold the turtle. However, I am saying without a doubt that they were the last people to have him, and that in two months, he has still not been sighted anywhere else.

If they did not sell him, then their choice to move him certainly seems to have brought about his untimely demise, leaving his girlfriend single and removing his genes from the species.

Furthermore, I spoke with several tour operators who said the initial complaint against the turtle was falsified.

They claim that he was good for business and made the tourists happy and that they would never have done anything that led to his removal.

It is certainly suspicious.

I hope that there will be an investigation, since selling an endangered species for profit is obviously illegal. However, given the diminished funding of the EPA, I worry that justice will not be served.

turtle and zebra fish.jpg

Side Note:

I have also not seen the female turtle who was hanging around the Piti Bomb Holes near Fish Eye. However, I am not sure that not seeing her is significant. Green Sea Turtles are not social, and it is possible that she was just around to “visit” a boy turtle for a bit.

This is what she looked like:

girlfriend

If you look, you can see that you doesn’t have a tail that extends past her shell, or claws on her flippers. Only males have those traits (which is actually to hold onto the female’s shell.)

She was a little smaller than the male turtle, but they seemed similar in size and age.

girlfriend two

Anyway:

The point of this post is that if anyone has any information about the green sea turtle lovingly called “Larry” or “Crush” who used to live at Fish Eye Marine Park, please let me know.

Thank you.

Tanguisson Bleaching 5/10/17

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

This album is from May of 2017.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

This is just some of the coral beaching that I have seen around Guam.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

I am trying to let NOAA and UOG know.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

It won’t help solve the problem, but it will help document what is happening.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Maybe I find documenting it comforting because at least I am doing something.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

It’s not a something that fixes anything, but it’s something.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

If you know anyone in Marine Biology, make sure to pass this information along to them.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Coral Bleaching at Gab Gab 9/2/17

Healthy coral has color to it. In the picture above, you can see healthy coral thriving at Gab Gab reef on May 2nd, 2017. This is what it is supposed to look like.

Unfortunately, the coral around the world is dying, and I want to talk about it for a moment.

short coral bleach four.jpg

Coral is made up of many tiny animals called Polyps.

These little animals have specialized chloroplast cells inside called zooxanthellae. These chloroplasts absorb sunlight and convert it to food for the polyp. Without them, a polyp will die.

When the water temperature in an area gets too hot, the zooxanthellae stop being able to work. They are sensitive to temperature, and so they die.

When they die and the polyp pushes them out, the coral becomes white (since polyps have no color.) Eventually, the polyps die and the coral becomes nothing more than skeletons covered in algae.

 

The reefs on Guam are bleaching. This is part of a worldwide event, which is being driven by climate change.

I wanted to share these pictures and videos in an effort to draw attention to the fact that this is happening, and how awful it is.

These pictures are taken at Gab Gab, just like the one at the top of the page. The difference is only a few months, but the difference in the temperature in the water is extremely noticeable.

Before, it used to be a little chilly when you first got in. Gab Gab is a reef that goes from the surface water level down more than one hundred feet. Deeper water, in my experience, tends to be colder.

And yet, yesterday when I got in the water, it was hot.

I beg you all to take a very close look.

I think a lot of people who have never been snorkeling or diving are able to easily ignore the bleaching of the corals and the dying of the reefs.

For me, living here, it is much harder.

Coral are home to thousands of species of animals, and as they die, those animals will also die.

The diversity of life that we had in our oceans was amazing, and losing it is absolutely horrifying.

I have no words beautiful enough or sad enough to write the eulogy for our oceans. Nothing said or written could capture how beautiful this reef was just a few months ago.

Seeing the reef now as it bleaches and dies is one of the most painful things I have ever seen.

Resume for Jenifer DeLemont

me_in_garden

Over the month of August 2017, I wrote about some of my very favorite things that I have done for work.

I thought I would write a post summarizing what I talked about over the last month, and what I learned from all of the cool experiences that I have been lucky enough to have.

Picture 356

In my 20’s I worked a lot with artists and musicians in various capacities. First as a promoter for concerts with Third Eye Promotions, but later in other capacities.

Working with artists and musicians taught me patience. Many of them are very wrapped up in their own world, and so there is a lot of listening and being accommodating required.

Of course, it’s also important to always have a backup plan and make sure that everything is organized way in advance. That way you can work around an artist having a meltdown and being unable to do what they are supposed to.

me and lauren

I was the editor of S.L.A.M. (Support Local Arts & Music) Magazine, as well as the curator of Alice’s Restaurant and Gallery.

This helped me gain years of experience as an effective manager. As Dale Carnegie would say, you have to talk in terms of the other person’s wants. The paperwork end is easy, but it’s handling the people that is the challenge.

Over the years, I was able to learn how to effectively communicate with people, and how to motivate them.

Picture 301

This was during the beginning of the First Friday Art Walk, and when the City of Phoenix was starting Copper Gate Square.

It was a wonderful time to be involved in local arts and music, and I am glad that I had the chance. However, I did learn that culture in a city is not something that just happens. It takes thousands of dollars in investment from a city, in addition to the work of many people.

I value the time I spent at Alice’s Restaurant and at SLAM Magazine a great deal. It was a wonderful way to spend the first half of my 20’s.

SPM Travel

Later I went to Arizona State University. I received a Bachelor’s Degree in Communications (with a minor in Sociology) from the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism at ASU.

While at ASU, I wrote for State Press News, State Press Magazine, College Affairs Magazine, and The East Valley Tribune.

This taught me time management and disciple more than anything else, because I was always so busy.

However, I learned a lot more than that. My college boyfriend was an Aerospace Engineer working on propulsion system research, so I learned about writing White Papers to apply for grants. In the meantime, I refused to go into debt. That meant scholarship breakfasts and networking. I hardly slept, but I graduated debt-free, having audited classes in Engineering in addition to my degree, and having learned a lot about the politics and funding in academia.

As if I wasn’t busy enough, I also worked as a bar tender part-time at The Dirty Drummer to help support myself.

me_and_danny_shoot_and_stuff 019

Bar tending definitely taught me a lot about handling people when they are drunk and angry.

I saw a lot of the world and learned to strike up a conversation with anyone. Skills like making drinks and getting along with people are very useful, and I am glad that I was able to learn them.

Once I graduated, I moved overseas with my husband, a sailor in the US Navy.

I got a job at Avalon English.

This helped me learn effective teaching methods and how to write a textbook. It also taught me to be adaptive, as the culture is very different from our own.

20120404_202321

It was wonderful being in Asia, because I was able to easily take my vacations in places like Japan, Thailand, and France (which I have written about before.)

However, after three years teaching at Avalon, my husband went for training in Mississippi on an unaccompanied tour. I took that time to see some family in Oregon, which was wonderful. I love the Pacific Northwest.

After that, we moved to the island of Guam, which is way out in the Pacific Ocean past Hawaii but not quite to the Philippines.

sea grill one sixty four

While there, I worked as the General Manager of Sea Grill Restaurant. However, I also worked on a lot of side projects, such as writing a Choose Your Own Adventure audio book called The Vampire’s Sister.

Guam was isolated, and so we faced complications because of that. We had plenty of weeks without electricity or fresh vegetables, and I guess that’s just part of living on an island.

On the upside, I was also able to get my dive certification and take some classes online. It’s never a bad thing to acquire new and different skills, right?


If you come across this post while Googling me before a job interview; hire me. I am dedicated, friendly, and a hard worker.

I am usually looking for a job in Communications, because that is what I went to college for and what I am best at. I do have experience in other fields as well, but when I sit down and reflect, my favorite moments were doing Public Relations work for Third Eye Promotions, or doing corporate training at Sea Grill. I love positions where I can use my skills in Communications to help people.

So, if you are hiring for a position that is related to Communications, Writing, or Public Relations; please consider me. I would be an asset to any company, and I promise to be cheerful and make drinks at the company parties. After all, I did bar tend my way through college.

ocean crop

Sea Grill Restaurant

sea grill ninty two

I spent three years on Guam. When I lived there I worked as the General Manager of Sea Grill Restaurant in Tumon (the largest village.)

sea grill fifty seven

Sea Grill was composed of Tail of the Whale Bar, The Rooftop Beer Garden, Diner Under the Sea (in the aquarium downstairs,) Sky Lounge upstairs, and the main dining room. We sometimes rented the rooms separately for tour groups or schools. However, usually they all functioned as one restaurant. All the food was cooked in the same kitchen.

sea grill one oh three

As anyone who has worked in a restaurant knows, it was long hours. I usually took Wednesdays off because it was the slowest day. However, I worked every other day of the week. Most days I worked open to close (11am to 11pm.) However, every month my managers and I would spend a late night doing inventory until 2am or so.

tables up in sky lounge

Sea Grill did buffets for every holiday, so that required a lot of extra attention. In addition, all events had to be coordinated with our marketing department, as well as with the plaza that we were part of. That meant that a lot of the job was talking to people and making sure that they were happy, or figuring out what would make them happy.

sea grill two

In addition to the routine things a manager deals with, I also did a lot of extra things.

I oversaw the remodel of the Tail of the Whale Bar. I also had to write new training manuals, implement a new food code passed by Guam in 2014, and organize special training for things like carrying trays (which the employees had never done before.) It was a lot to coordinate.

sea grill eighty four

I enjoyed my time at Sea Grill, and my boss Erik Pederson was a great guy. I would have loved to stay there! Unfortunately, I had a medical problem that prevented me from working for Sea Grill the whole time I was in Guam.

guam food code with tabs

Still, I had a great time. Managing a restaurant is hard work, but it’s rewarding. I made sure to leave copious notes when I left, and that things were in good hands.

I will always think of Sea Grill fondly.

sea grill one sixty four

Avalon English

me_in_garden

After I graduated from ASU, I took a job teaching English in South Korea.

korean_parade

I really wasn’t prepared for how hard it was going to be to adjust to the culture. I had to learn about new holidays, as well as a new language, and new ways to shop and travel.

jogyesa_the_tree

I had volunteered as a teacher at The Thomas J Papas School for the Homeless, so I had a little bit of experience in a classroom. I had also volunteered at Tumbleweeds shelter (for teens) so I had a little bit of experience in talking with kids about difficult subjects.

teachers

However, nothing could prepare me for the role of a teacher in South Korean society. They expect a person to teach morals and values in addition to the subject matter. In Korea, it takes a village to raise a child. If any child asks you a question about anything, you’re supposed to give them your perspective.

29 014

At first this was hard, but I did learn to give advice with my lessons and to keep a cheerful and productive classroom in the meantime.

20121030_201701

Later, I was given the freedom to design my own curriculum and write my own textbooks. I was very proud of my Dungeons and Dragons class, because the kids really enjoyed it, and they learned a lot of vocabulary from it.

20120404_202321

I completed three contracts in South Korea, and worked under four different school directors. I was able to manage all the transition and complication, and still find time to explore the country.

20121119_204152

In the end, it taught me a lot about teaching. However, I learned a lot more than that. I learned about culture, language and International Business. I gained perspective and became a more well-rounded person. I am very proud of the time I spent there.

20130219_182725

The Dirty Drummer

drink_umbrellas

Through my twenties, I did a lot of things. I earned an Associates Degree from Paradise Valley Community College, and a Bachelors Degree from Arizona State University.

me_and_danny_shoot_and_stuff 019

In addition, I managed Alice’s Restaurant, and curated the art gallery inside.

I also was also the Editor in Chief for SLAM Magazine, in addition to being a staff writer for The East Valley Tribune, State Press Magazine and State Press News. In addition, I freelanced for College Affair Magazine.

new_years

Through all of that, I worked at The Dirty Drummer Bar and Grill as a bar tender. The owner’s name is Zane Anderson, and he is still a friend. He went out of his way to work around all my other projects and give me a schedule I could work to supplement my income.

bar and Shari 018

I worked there for a long time, and I am proud to have made life long friends there.

It’s not the nicest bar in the world. However, it is a lot like that show Cheers, with regular customers who you need to know by name and drink. We had theme nights, dressed up for Halloween, and did a 5k every year to raise money for breast cancer research. It was a lot like a family.

70s_night 027